ARTISTS & PERFORMERS

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Artist Photo Artist Bio
Billy Eckstine (July 8, 1914 – March 8, 1993) was an American jazz and pop singer, and a bandleader of the swing era. He was noted for his rich, resonant, almost operatic bass-baritone voice. Eckstine's recording of "I Apologize" (MGM, 1948) was awarded the Grammy Hall of Fame Award in 1999. He attended Armstrong High School, St. Paul Normal and Industrial School, and Howard University. He left Howard in 1933, after winning first place in an amateur talent contest. Heading to Chicago, Eckstine joined Earl Hines' Grand Terrace Orchestra in 193... Continue reading
Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor. Crosby's trademark warm bass-baritone voice made him the best-selling recording artist of the 20th century, having sold over one billion records, tapes, compact discs and digital downloads around the world. The first multimedia star, from 1931 to 1954 Crosby was a leader in record sales, radio ratings, and motion picture grosses. His early career coincided with technical recording innovations such as the microphone. This allowed him to develop a laid-back, intimat... Continue reading
Bob Eberly (July 24, 1916, Mechanicville, New York – November 17, 1981, Glen Burnie, Maryland) was a big band vocalist, best known for his association with Jimmy Dorsey and his duets with Helen O'Connell. His younger brother Ray was also a big-band singer, most notably with Glenn Miller's orchestra. He recorded the original version of "I'm Glad There Is You" in 1942 with Jimmy Dorsey and His Orchestra. The song subsequently became a jazz and pop standard. In 1953, Eberly and Helen O'Connell headlined a summer replacement program for Perry Com... Continue reading
The Boswell Sisters were a close harmony singing group, consisting of sisters Martha (June 9, 1905 – July 2, 1958), Connee (December 3, 1907 – October 11, 1976), and Helvetia "Vet" (May 20, 1911 – November 12, 1988), noted for intricate harmonies and rhythmic experimentation. They attained national prominence in the United States in the 1930s. In 1925 they made their first record for the Victor Records. They appeared on radio programs and recorded music to be dubbed into films. The trio had a program on CBS from 1931 to 1933. After a few ... Continue reading
Buddy Rich (September 30, 1917 – April 2, 1987) was an American jazz drummer and bandleader. Widely considered one of the most influential drummers of all time and known for his virtuoso technique, power, and speed, Rich was billed as "the world's greatest drummer" during his career. He performed with many bandleaders, most notably Tommy Dorsey, Harry James, Count Basie, and led his own big band. Rich’s talent for rhythm was first noted by his father, who saw that Buddy could keep a steady beat with spoons at the age of one. He began playin... Continue reading
Bunny Berigan (November 2, 1908 – June 2, 1942) was an American jazz trumpeter and bandleader who rose to fame during the swing era, but whose career and influence were shortened by a losing battle with alcoholism that ended with his early death at age 33 from cirrhosis. Although he composed some jazz instrumentals such as "Chicken and Waffles" and "Blues", Berigan was best known for his virtuoso jazz trumpeting. His 1937 classic recording "I Can't Get Started" was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1975. He attended the University of W... Continue reading
Cab Calloway (December 25, 1907 – November 18, 1994) was an African-American jazz singer and bandleader. He was strongly associated with the Cotton Club in Harlem, New York City, where he was a regular performer. Calloway was a master of energetic scat singing and led one of the United States' most popular big bands from the start of the 1930s to the late 1940s. Calloway's band featured performers including trumpeters Dizzy Gillespie and Adolphus "Doc" Cheatham, saxophonists Ben Webster and Leon "Chu" Berry, New Orleans guitar ace Danny Barke... Continue reading
Carmen Cavallaro (May 6, 1913 – October 12, 1989) was an American pianist. He established himself as one of the most accomplished and admired light music pianists of his generation. Known as the “Poet of the Piano”, he showed a gift for music from age three, picking out tunes on a toy piano. As a young pianist, he toured Europe, performing in many capitals. In 1933 Cavallaro joined Al Kavelin's orchestra, where he quickly became the featured soloist. After four years he switched to a series of other big bands, including Rudy Vallee's in 1... Continue reading
Carroll Gibbons (January 4, 1903 – May 10, 1954) was an American-born pianist, bandleader and popular composer who made his career primarily in England during the British dance band era. In his late teens he travelled to London to study at the Royal Academy of Music. In 1924 he returned to London with the brassless Boston Orchestra for an engagement at the Savoy Hotel in the Strand. He liked Britain so much that he settled there and later became the co-leader of the Savoy Orpheans and the bandleader of the New MayFair Orchestra, which recorde... Continue reading
Charlie Barnet (October 26, 1913 – September 4, 1991) was an American jazz saxophonist, composer, and bandleader. His major recordings were "Skyliner", "Cherokee", "The Wrong Idea", "Scotch and Soda", "In a Mizz", and "Southland Shuffle". Charlie Barnet was born in New York City. His parents divorced when he was two, and he was raised by his mother and her grandparents. He learned to play piano and saxophone as a child. He often left school to listen to music and to try to gain work as a musician. By sixteen, Barnet had done road work with a ... Continue reading
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